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Category: Peer Crowds

Latest Updates, LGBT, Social Branding, Tobacco

Quit with CRUSH Campaign Motivates Gay Smokers To Give Up Cigarettes

Rescue SCG has worked with the Southern Nevada Health Department on tobacco prevention programs since 2001. One of these programs is CRUSH, a social brand for LGBT young adults designed to break the association between smoking and LGBT culture. Last July, CRUSH launched a new campaign to encourage gay smokers in Southern Nevada to make a seven-day commitment to quit smoking cigarettes.

The 3-week campaign featured a video to motivate gay smokers to sign up for the seven-day challenge to quit, and received more than 20,000 views during the length of the campaign.

The campaign also included a custom developed web application and mobile site that made it easy for gay smokers to announce their decision to quit on Facebook and Twitter with a custom image share. Each image featured a variety of culturally relevant reasons for gay smokers to give up cigarettes. The CRUSH community provided a network of support and cessation resources to current smokers.

Rescue SCG worked with LGBT media partners, such as Queerty.com, social media partners and social influencers to help raise awareness for the campaign and to highlight the tobacco industry’s unique influence on the LGBT community. The campaign received a wide range of local and national coverage, reached over 44,000 unique users per week, and resulted in over three million ad impressions.

More than one hundred Southern Nevada residents signed up for the contest, and those that successfully completed the seven-day challenge were entered for a drawing to win a pair of Lady Gaga tickets.

To learn more about the Quit with CRUSH campaign, contact:

Tyler Janzen

Tyler@rescuescg.com

Director of Client Services, State and Local Programs
Hip Hop, Research, Social Branding

Fresh Society: A New Tobacco Prevention Campaign for Hip Hop Teens

Introducing Fresh Society, a tobacco prevention campaign designed specifically for teens that identify with Hip Hop culture. Earlier this year Fresh Society launched in New Mexico and is already reaching this hard-to-reach audience.

Alternative, Latest Updates, Social Branding, Tobacco

Tobacco Prevention With Rock Band And Their Pets

#ShowYourClaws is Rescue SCG’s newest campaign for Blacklist, a tobacco prevention Social Branding program in the alternative rock community.

Rural/Country, Social Branding, Tobacco
  • The Down Low on Down and Dirty

Rescue Agency Launches New Tobacco Prevention Campaign For Rural Teens

Rural teens have some of the highest tobacco use rates for both cigarettes and smokeless products. Past tobacco prevention efforts have appealed mostly to urban and suburban teens because rural teens are different. Their culture, values, and lifestyle are truly distinct and reaching these teens requires an authentic voice and message.

Meet Down and Dirty, Rescue Agency’s newest teen tobacco prevention campaign:

LGBT, Social Branding, Tobacco
Preventing LGBTQ Tobacco Use Through Bars and NIghtclubs

Preventing LGBTQ Tobacco Use Through Bars and Nightclubs

The evening between the 8th National LGBTQ Health Equity Summit and the 2012 National Conference on Tobacco or Health, Rescue Agency hosted an LGBTQ bar night to demonstrate its Social Branding strategy for LGBTQ tobacco use prevention.

Check out this brand new video documenting the night and how veteran tobacco control professionals reacted to the strategy.

Four Evidence-Based Principles for Creating Measurable Social Value

As public health advocates we know that just telling people to do something doesn’t have much of an impact. Fortunately, social marketing principles have shown that creating social and personal value can spark and drive behavior change.

At the 2016 Agents of Change Summit, Jeff French said “The question you should ask yourself everyday: How can I create some measurable social value for the people that I’m trying to help?”

So, how can you create measurable social value? Start with four evidence-based principles:

  1. Citizen Insight:

    Know your audience and invest in understanding them. Go beyond basic demographics and figure out what motivates and drives them. Make sure you’re able to see the problem from their perspective. For example, some young adults might not be driven by preventing lung cancer but certain young adults, like Hipsters, do care about standing up against the animal testing and harmful environmental practices of big tobacco. People will chose to perform the same behavior for different reasons, so find the one that most aligns with your audience’s values. In turn, the behavior you are promoting will be seen as more valuable by your audience. The best public health programs are based on a deep contextual understanding of your audience and not just what you want to tell them.

  2. Systemic Action:

    Are you working on a one-off project or on creating momentum toward the bigger picture? Many public health challenges are interconnected, and if you’re working on one simple solution, chances are your focus is being drowned out by other competing factors. Understanding how different variable affect your behavior can help your efforts be more relevant. For example, if you’re working to get children to consume less sugar sweetened beverages, look beyond just parents not serving soda at home, and look at the policies of what is on the school lunch line, what coaches serve at practice, and the juice boxes at afterschool programs. Giving parents a way to educate the other adults influencing their children’s beverage intake can provide them with valuable tools to improve their family’s health

  3. Co-creation:

    Engage your audience so they can be part of the solution. When the audience is engaged, they derive value from the process as well as the campaign’s outcome. Look for ways you can work toward sustained and purposeful relationships that make the issue a personal one. Youth engagement models are particularly effective because they’re driven by the audience the campaign is looking to serve. But whether you’re engaging youth or adults, the engagement must contribute towards a tangible and meaningful outcome. Nothing undermines engagement efforts moran engagement just for the sake of engagement.

  4. Compelling Social Offers:

    Focus on creating compelling and relevant social offers that people actually want. Is another brochure valuable to your audience? Are you giving people something with benefits? If teenagers perceive the benefit of drinking to be a fun and social night out, asking them to stay home and not drink isn’t compelling, whereas engaging them at an event with live music and activities might be. Be aware of the perceived value of the behavior you are trying to change, and ensure that you are positioning the replacement behavior in an equally or more valuable light.

For more examples of how to ensure your campaigns add value, check out Jeff French’s presentation, “Behavior Change That Creates Value For Your Audience” from the Agents of Change Summit.

NAA Convention 2015 Posted: March 6th, 2015